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Adirondack Rustic Interiors’ Screen Doors are One Dimensional Sculptures

By Anthony F. Hall

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

What would summer be without screen doors slapping against their wood frames as children race in and out?

It certainly wouldn’t sound like summer, at least not in the Adirondacks. Nor would a camp or cottage smell or feel quite like summer if interiors were entirely insulated from the elements.

So it makes perfect sense that Adirondack Rustic Interiors, the Warrensburg based home furnishings shop that celebrates the styles made famous by the Great Camps,  should  find itself a source for screen doors for people from across the country.

They’re not, however, your ordinary wood screen door. They’re custom built and each has carved decorations chosen by the homeowner or designed by himself.

In effect, they’re one dimensional, functional pieces of sculpture.

“We receive orders from all over the country; from California and Alaska as well as the Adirondacks,” said Jenny Massaro, who owns the shop with her husband Bill and their daughter Jenelle. “Every business has to have its own niche, so we’re pleased to be known as the store selling handmade, custom designed screen doors. But we never thought these screen doors would become one of our biggest sellers.”

The decorative elements include forest vegetation like pine trees and wildlife like deer, bear and moose. (Rachael Ray chose a moose for hers.)

When designing their own doors, homeowners can be as inventive as they wish. They can send the Massaros pictures of their house or their pets or suggest a design. A shore owner, for instance, recently requested seashells for a beach house.

Adirondack Rustic Interiors is located on Warrensburg’s Main Street, opposite the Church of the Holy Cross.

“We offer furniture, lighting, and décor made by area craftsmen from natural materials found in the region, then handcrafted into beautiful creations. We specialize in custom design for that piece you just can’t find anywhere else,” said Jenny Massaro.

That furniture, too, can be customized to suit the individual homeowners’ décor.

The store, however, is not limited to big-ticket items, and stocks gifts and accessories as well.

Adirondack Rustic Interiors is located at 3755 Main Street. Call (518) 623-9855 for more information.

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Adirondack Rustic Interiors’ Screen Doors are One Dimensional Sculpture

By Mirror Staff

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

What would summer be without screen doors slapping against their wood frames as children race in and out?

It certainly wouldn’t sound like summer, at least not in the Adirondacks. Nor would a camp or cottage smell or feel quite like summer if interiors were entirely insulated from the elements.

So it makes perfect sense that Adirondack Rustic Interiors, the Warrensburg-based home furnishings shop that celebrates the styles made famous by the Great Camps, should  find itself a source for screen doors for people from across the country.

 They’re not, however, your ordinary wood screen door. They’re custom built and each has carved decorations chosen by the homeowner or designed by himself.

In effect, they’re one dimensional, functional pieces of sculpture.

“We receive orders from all over the country; from California and Alaska as well as the Adirondacks,” said Jenny Massaro, who owns the shop with her husband Bill and their daughter Jenelle. “Every business has to have its own niche, so we’re pleased to be known as the store selling handmade, custom designed screen doors. But we never thought these screen doors would become one of our biggest sellers.”

The decorative elements include forest vegetation like pine trees and wildlife like deer, bear and moose. (Rachael Ray chose a moose for hers.)

When designing their own doors, homeowners can be as inventive as they wish. They can send the Massaros pictures of their house or their pets or suggest a design. A shore owner, for instance, recently requested seashells for a beach house.

 Adirondack Rustic Interiors is located on Warrensburg’s Main Street, opposite the Church of the Holy Cross.

“We offer furniture, lighting, and décor made by area craftsmen from natural materials found in the region, then handcrafted into beautiful creations. We specialize in custom design for that piece you just can’t find anywhere else,” said Jenny Massaro.

That furniture, too, can be customized to suit the individual homeowners’ décor.

The store, however, is not limited to big-ticket items, and stocks gifts and accessories as well.

Adirondack Rustic Interiors is located at 3755 Main Street. Call (518) 623-9855 for more information.

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Matt Petersen and Domenick Pfau.

Matt Petersen and Domenick Pfau.

Local: New Bolton Landing Business Wears its Name Proudly

By Buzz Lamb

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Webster’s New Compact Desk Dictionary defines “local” as an adjective which is characteristic of, or confined to a particular place.  Bolton residents Matt Peterson and Domenick Pfau say “local” represents a sense of community – a sense of home.

The two recent college grads, both 22, held the grand opening of their T-shirt shop in Bolton Landing on Saturday, June 21.  The name of their business is “local” and it’s situated in the building directly behind the recently-opened Mikado Sushi restaurant on Main Street.

“We’re not your run-of-the-mill T-shirt shop,” Peterson said.  “What we wanted to do from the very beginning is show that our business can make high-quality products that are affordable,” he said.  “They don’t make ‘em like they used to.  We don’t make ‘em like you’re used to,” he said.

Peterson said the duo started an online clothing business in 2011 when they were college sophomores in South Carolina.  “We went online to buy tank-tops because we thought they were cool shirts.  But, they were $30 and we thought that was ridiculous,” Peterson said.  As a result, they started an online business called Tank Top Tuesdays.

Today most brick and mortar stores make every effort to develop a successful online presence.  Peterson and Pfau took the opposite approach.  After graduation they decided to open a retail operation to supplement their successful online company.

Local residents model Local's clothing.

“We make everything right here,” Peterson said.  “We draw the designs.  We make the silk screens. And we print the shirts right here,” he said.  Peterson said the line of “local” clothing has “local” printed on the front and a silhouette of Lake George running down the spine on the back.

“When people see the “local” logo on the front of the shirt they always ask, ‘What’s on the back’”, Pfau said.  “We’ve only been in operation here for three days and our retail sales have already exceeded our online orders,” Pfau said.  “We did a “local” shirt last year at college with a South Carolina Fourth of July theme.  We sold out the first run of 100 shirts within one week,” Peterson added.

“Local is a chance for us to really connect to Lake George,” Pfau said.  “We want to bring people together from all around Lake George with our original, hand-crafted “local” apparel,” he said.  “It’s important to us that all of our shirts are hand-printed right in our shop so that people can get a genuine feel for the community and the “local” mentality.”

  Peterson said one of their unique shirts is the Rum Trail Design.  “It’s a Route 9N shirt.  We did some research on the history of the area and discovered that Route 9N was one of the routes used to smuggle rum from Canada into the U.S. during Prohibition,” he said.  “People will recognize the Route 9N street sign.  That’s what we want to do…focus on this area because we love it and we’re so proud of it.”

There are multiple products available at the store including tank-tops, long and short sleeve T-shirts, sweatshirts, koozies and decals.  “We plan on adding Sara Pfau jewelry after July Fourth,” Peterson said.  “We’re always looking for new products,” he said.

The innovative entrepreneurs plan on keeping the store open 7-days-a-week from “ten-ish to six-ish.  We’ll see how it goes,” they both said in unison. “We might stay open some nights, too.  After Labor Day we’ll probably be open only weekends,” Pfau said.

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Lake George’s Glory Days Reborn as Retro T-Shirts

Lake George’s Glory Days Reborn as Retro T-Shirts

Happy Jacks Expands Line of Authentic Retro Lake George Products

By Mirror Staff

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Happy Jacks, the funky Bolton Landing clothing and gift shop, has added to its line of retro t-shirts bearing the logos of long-gone Lake George resorts, marinas, restaurants and bars.

Based on advertisements and logos created by the printers at Adirondack Resorts Press, the company that publishes the Lake George Mirror, and which appeared as advertisements in guides and brochures as well as in the Lake George Mirror itself in the 1950s and 60s, the t-shirts were introduced two summers ago and have become one of Happy Jacks’ most popular brands.

“They’re especially popular with adults,” said Happy Jacks owner Jeff Strief.  “They have a nostalgic appeal for people for whom these places were touchstones. At the same time, the shirts have a retro-cool look, which maybe makes people feel younger – less like an uptight dad. The more places we add to the line, the more popular the series as a whole becomes.”

Every shirt comes with a tag offering a bit of information about the businesses, and longtime residents who have come into the shop have supplemented that with details from their own memories, said Strief.

“Tops, for instance, is described as the Village’s first biker bar; Lake George Bowl was owned by the mayor of Lake George Village; Sunny Brook Acres was a resort on the grounds of New York Times publisher Adolph Och’s former estate and its nightclub was popular with people from every town on the lake,” said Strief.

New to the shop this summer are shirts emblazoned with: a 1950s rendition of the logo, “Queen of American Lakes,” a phrase which the Lake George Mirror coined in the 1890s; a highway map of the Adirondack Park directing visitors to popular roadside attractions, such as Story Town, Frontier Town, Ausable Chasm and the Land of Make Believe; the Antlers, a lakeside bar known for hiring only the most beautiful of the college students who flocked to Lake George in the 1960s; and the Jolly Roger. Built by Schenectady industrialist Henry Wright, the Jolly Roger was both modern and swank, with a bar situated in front of a wall of glass overlooking the lake. By the 1970s it was gone, demolished to make room for an expansion of Shepard Park.

Among last year’s most popular t-shirts, and brought back to satisfy the demand, is one based on advertisements for “U-Drive-It Speedboats” at Lamb Brothers in Bolton Landing.

According to Buzz Lamb, his father Walt and his brothers Norm and Bob bought Lamb & Sons from their father after returning to Bolton Landing from World War II.

“Lamb’s U-Drive-It boat rentals were somewhat legendary as they rented some pretty unusual boats,” said Lamb.  “One that comes to mind was a 1953 19-foot Chris Craft Racer, which had a 158 hp Chris Craft engine equipped with triple down-draft carburetors.  Of course, it was the most expensive boat in the rental fleet but I can tell you it was never at the dock.  Another fast and very popular boat with the renters was Zip, a 16-foot red-white-and-blue Chris Craft.”

“All of boats had names on the stern and that was how they were identified on the rental rate sheet.  Customers asked for boats by name. Fishermen always asked for Poseidon because not only did it have steering and shifting in the bow, it had similar controls aft so that anglers could handle their lines and steer the boat at the same time.

“Probably what people will also have a recollection of is the era from the mid-1950s to the late 1960s when Lamb Brothers offered ‘fast speedboat rides through the Narrows’ to Paradise Bay and back. It was an inexpensive way to cool off on a hot summer day. Lamb Brothers had a public address system with speakers announcing ‘fast speedboat rides through the Narrows’ three times a day, every day. They said ‘fast speedboat rides through the Narrows’ so frequently, it almost got to the point where it was annoying,” Lamb recalled

In addition to more retro t-shirts, Strief has added another item to his line of Adirondack Resorts Press Products: a jig saw puzzle based on Adirondack Resorts brochures.

“I was looking for a Lake George image to have made into a jigsaw puzzle when I realized that I had access to all these great images from the Adirondack Resorts Press archives,” said Strief. “Those images also made it a fun puzzle; the more images in a puzzle, the more there is to discern as it begins to come together.”

Introduced in time for the July 4 holiday, the puzzle is selling “incredibly well,” said Strief.

Like the retro Lake George t-shirts, offering a distinctive Lake George product that no other store carries not only attracts customers but strengthens Happy Jacks unique brand, said Strief.

“No other shop is like ours, and these products both demonstrate that and increase our stock of things you can’t find anywhere else,” said Strief.

Adirondack Resorts Press was the premier publisher of Lake George brochures, guides, maps and post cards from the 1920s through the early 1970s, said Tony Hall, the publisher of the Lake George Mirror and the president of Adirondack Resorts Press, Inc.,

The company even developed its own distinctive method of printing four-color images, which it called Colorgraph.

When Lisa and Tony Hall purchased Adirondack Resorts Press and the Lake George Mirror in 1997, they inherited the vault of advertising images and designs.

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Russel Wright Tableware.

Russel Wright Tableware.

Bolton Landing’s Next Summer Finds Inspiration in Mid-Century Designer

By Mirror Staff

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Local residents and visitors viewing “Russel Wright: The Nature of Design,” a new exhibition at the New York State Museum in Albany, may wish to stop by Next Summer on the way home.

The Bolton Landing home furnishings shop sells ceramic plates, pitchers, and vases by the famed mid-century designer.

According to Next Summer owner Matthew Slaughter, Wright’s original designs are still manufactured by a small California company called Bauer, whom Wright licensed to produce his work.

“Any authentic, contemporary piece by Russell Wright is made by Bauer,” said Slaughter. “The company began working with Wright in 1946, and before his death in 1976, he authorized the company to continue producing his work because of its dedication to his standards and principles.”

Slaughter emphasizes that Russel Wright dishes are not merely one product among many carried by the shop.

Manitoga, home of Russel Wright.

“In many ways, Russel Wright was an inspiration for the shop,” said Slaughter.  “I was always impressed by his statement, “the table is the heart of the home.”

According to Slaughter, Russel Wright’s inexpensive, mass-produced dinnerware, furniture, appliances and textiles were not only visually and technically innovative, but tools to achieve his vision of ‘easier living,’ an American lifestyle that was gracious yet contemporary and informal.

“That’s what true design is about – creating an atmosphere, conveying not just a life style but a way of life.  At Next Summer, it’s the lake life, which can also be gracious and informal at the same time,” said Slaughter.

Other lines carried by Next Summer supplement and expand upon that vision of design in the service of contemporary living, said Slaughter.

Another principle that Slaughter attributes to Russel Wright was also an inspiration for the shop, he said.

“He believed that beautifully designed, well-made products should be affordable. That’s our philosophy, and that’s the type of product we search out and like to offer,” said Slaughter.

Russel Wright was born in 1904 and is credited with revolutionizing the American home and the way people lived. Collaborating with his wife Mary, Wright disseminated his designs and ideas in exhibitions, books, articles, advertisements, radio interviews, and demonstration rooms in department stores.

“Russel Wright: The Nature of Design,” which will be on view at the State Museum through December 31, explores Wright’s career from the 1920s through the 1970s and features approximately 40 objects along with photographs and design sketches.

The exhibit also includes a video with images created by Wright to explain his conception of Manitoga, his final home and estate and now a national historic landmark, located in Garrison, New York. Built into an abandoned stone quarry, the modernist home and 75-acre garden was Wright’s most inventive and holistic realization of his philosophy and goal to live in harmony with nature and good design.

For more information about “Russel Wright: The Nature of Design,” call the New York State Museum at 518-474-5877.

 

 

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Kathy Miller

Kathy Miller

Love Is On Lake George

By Mirror Staff

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Love is on Lake George is not merely a slogan, says Kathy Miller, the Rockhurst resident who created the brand two years ago, and which is now emblazoned on shopping bags, beverage koozies, water bottle slings, trivets and clothing.

“Love truly is on Lake George,” said Miller. “That’s where people are happiest. That’s the thought that comes to me whenever I look at pictures of my parents in their boat or think about my children. We wanted to create a brand that would somehow capture those feelings.”

Miller’s parents, Dr. Ed and Marie Farhart lived in Glens Falls, where Dr. Farhart was a well-known dentist and where Kathy grew up. But every summer they would rent a cabin at Takundewide. In 1964, the Farharts bought a lot at Rockhurst, where they built the house that the Millers now own.

“My sons spent their first summers with their grandparents, and they still think of Lake George as their home. One son proposed to his wife on Buck Mountain, the other was married here. So we can’t help but associate Lake George with love,” said Miller.

“We realized that everyone who experiences Lake George has their own Love is on Lake George story,” says Kathy’s husband Ron, a Navy pilot who worked in the aerospace industry before retiring, “That’s why we saw potential for Lake George destination marketing.”

“We know the Lake George experience is in people’s heads and hearts, but we wanted to create products that would remind them of that experience whenever they looked at one of our pieces,” said Kathy Miller.

After developing the distinctive logo, the couple then began searching for the right products on which to display it.

“We looked for product manufacturers who would work with us, who would share their creativity with us so that we could offer things that were useful but still decorative, and, of course, unique,” said Ron Miller.

“People who love Lake George have not only responded to the products, they’ve suggested other items that would be appropriate for the logo,” said Ron Miller.

Next Summer, the home furnishings shop in Bolton Landing, is one of the Millers’ outlets.

“Matthew Slaughter, one of Next Summer’s owners, displays the products very well,” said Miller.

The shop carries the bags, koozies, water bottle slings, children’s clothing, cards and decals as well as metal trivets, shelf sitters and ornaments.

“When we first started, we didn’t know a lot about packaging, design or marketing, but when you find people who can help, you’re off to the races,” said Ron Miller.

The products are available individually in shops and marinas, including:Cleverdale Country Store in Cleverdale, Bean’s Country Store in Queensbury; Waterfront Living and the Lake George Steamboat Company in Lake George; Yankee Boating Center in Diamond Point; and Famiglia’s Italian Deli, Chic’s Marina, Next Summer and F.R. Smith & Sons in Bolton Landing.

The products can also be purchased in bulk for weddings, reunions, anniversaries, vacations and conferences through the Millers’ website, LoveisonLakeGeorge.com.

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From the Studio to the Shop: ANCA’s Annual Buyers Days Show Connects Adirondack Artisans with Local Retailers

By Anthony F. Hall

Friday, April 20, 2012

Throughout the Adirondacks, cottage industries are thriving. Some people move here to practice a craft, while others take one up as year-round, full time jobs grow scarce.

In Long Lake, for instance, forty of the 711 year-round residents make their living as artisans and craftsmen.

Getting the product to the market, however, can be difficult, and that’s why many craftsmen depend upon the Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA).

ANCA was founded in the 1950s to bring new industry to the region. The organization is still doing that, but it’s also assisting people like Peter Shrope, who makes pottery in Rainbow Lake.

His line of ceramics, which he calls Rockware for its glazes made from native stone, was among the products on display at ANCA’s annual Buyer Days, held this year at the Civic Center in Saratoga Springs on March 7 and 8.

 

“ANCA’s mission is to build the local economy, and artisans are such an important part of that economy,” said ANCA’s communications director Melissa Hart, who organized this year’s show. “We foster collaborative relationships throughout the Adirondack Park, and with this show, we’re fostering connections between producers and retailers.”

The Buyers Days event is a trade show, but a juried one. Only producers of hand crafted or locally sourced products are allowed to exhibit their wares. Owners of gift shops, markets and museum stores typically attend the show every year.

“We invite everyone who wants to get more local products into their shops,” said Hart. “For the shop owners, it’s a chance to meet the producers and learn the stories behind the products. They’re shopping locally, which enables the consumer to shop locally.”

According to Stephanie Ratcliffe, the executive director of the Wild Center in Tupper Lake, local products support eco-tourism.

“People visit the Adirondacks to have an authentic experience, and they want something authentic to take home; they want a piece of the Adirondacks,” Ratcliffe said.

Deb Morris, whose Barkeater Chocolates will be sold at Dave’s Market in Bolton Landing this summer, noted that her customers value the experience of buying a local product almost as much as the product itself.

“I don’t have a shop, but people know they can find me in the commercial kitchen we use in North Creek. I tell people we ship, but they’d rather make a special trip to buy the chocolate themselves,” she said.

Having so many producers in one place, at one time, makes it that much easier to stock his shop with local wares, said Doug Deneen, the owner of Trees, a book and gift shop in Bolton Landing.

“If I went to a typical trade show, I wouldn’t be assured that the products were local. When we bought our shop a few years ago, I didn’t necessarily know who the best local crafts people were, or how to contact them. This show introduced them to me, and allows me to meet new producers,” said Deneen.

Since he started attending the show, Deneen has placed orders for rustic frames and mirrors, soaps, photographs, prints, t-shirts and books.

His best source for books about the Adirondacks is North Country Books, a publisher and distributor whose president, Rob Igoe, was at this year’s show.

“We know from experience that books about the Adirondacks are frequently purchased as souvenirs of the Adirondacks,” said Igoe. “That’s why we’re insulated from competition from e-books and e-readers. You can’t take home an e-book and put it on your coffee table.”

Igoe does worry, though, about the loss of small, independent bookstores, which have suffered from the expansion of on-line retailers and e-books.

“We need new outlets for our books, especially the Adirondack classics that we feel a duty to keep in print. That’s why this show is important,” said Igoe.

Almost all craftsmen now sell their wares through the internet, some more than others.

Barkeater Chocolates’ Deb Morris said 40% of her business now comes through her website.

Others, like rustic artisan Melisa Fox, rely primarily upon shops like Trees, where her twig and birch bark frames and mirrors are sold.

Morris has also embraced social media to get her message out, while Fox prefers the personal contacts made through shows like Buyer Days.

“For a lots of craftsmen, this is the only place where they can show their work,” said Fox. “For us, it’s the perfect fit. All of our material is locally-sourced. I collect the raw product from the woods and recycle it.”

Whatever their differences, both Morris and Fox have at least one thing in common. Both said their businesses grew from a passion for their craft. And it’s passion, when paired with finely honed skills, that makes Adirondack products truly unique.

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Denis Lemek

Denis Lemek

Lake George Man Invents Safety Device for Snowboarders: the Booty Guard

By Mirror Staff

Saturday, February 11, 2012

When Denis Lemek was a boy, he cracked his tailbone during a tobogganing accident. He can still remember the pain.

So when he took up snowboarding a few years ago, while in his mid-fifties, he wanted to protect himself from a similar injury. “Wearing a helmet is now the norm; protecting the tailbone should be, too,” he says. The products purporting to protect the tailbone, though, seemed inadequate, so Lemek devised one of his own.

“Since I’m retired, I had the time and the resources to develop a product, find a manufacturer and then market and distribute it myself,” said Lemek.

He found a motorcycle parts manufacturer in New Hampshire that could make the product.  His son Kevin created the logo and packaging, and in 2011, Lemek began selling the “Booty Guard.”

“From the start, it was very well-received, so that gave me hope that it would be successful,” said Lemek.

With his $20,000 investment, Lemek acquired 1,000 pieces, which are sold for $19.95 per device on-line at bootyguard.com and through the shops at Gore, Killington, Pico and Willard as well as at Sports Page in Glens Falls.

Lemek, who spent most of his career on Long Island with the retailer J.C. Penney, began visiting Lake George in 1983, when he attended his first Americade. He bought a house here in 2002, and now spends most of his time here.

“Everything I like to do, I can do in Lake George,” said Lemek.

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Sally and Jim Rypkema

Sally and Jim Rypkema

Hague Keeps its Market, the Oldest in the Adirondacks

By Anthony F. Hall

Monday, December 5, 2011

As a fifth generation resident of Hague, it’s not surprising that Sally DeLarm Rypkema considered saving the Hague Market a civic priority.

Established in 1900, it’s said to be the oldest continuously operated general store in the Adirondacks, and for most of its history, it has served as an informal community center, a place where people meet as well as shop.

But Rypkema has ties to the Hague Market stronger than even her oldest neighbors’.  She worked there. When she was five years old.

“For the first six years of my life, my family lived next door, at the dairy, and the market’s owners, Bob and Ada Hoyt, who had no children of their own, seemed happy to have me around. They even gave me a job – selling penny candy to the other kids,” said Rykema.

When Art Seitz put the market up for sale several years ago, Rypkema and her husband Jim considered purchasing it, but the timing wasn’t right.

Jim continued to work with his family’s business in New Jersey and Sally opened Juniper Design and Goods, a home furnishings shop and interior design firm, which is also located on Hague’s Main Street.

The Hague Market

The decision by Doug and Sharon Zeyak to sell the market earlier this year presented them with a second chance to own the market, as well as an opportunity to aid the town.

“The town needs the market, in a big way,” said Rypkema. “It’s nice to be able to run to a local market. And this market was once the center of Hague. Everybody came in to chat about what was going on. We wanted to be certain that Hague would always have that.”

According to Jim Rypekema, the market will re-open within the next two months.

Since the couple purchased the market, “There’s been a lot of excitement, which is very encouraging” said Jim. “People are pleased to see that the building has been repainted.”

Much of his time has been spent renovating the market’s commercial space and upstairs apartment.

“Structurally, we’re not changing anything, and we’re keeping as many of the details as possible, such as the tin ceiling and the hardwood floors. We want a traditional country store,” said Jim.

While the store will stock staples, its line of offerings “will evolve, as we learn more about what people need and want,” said Jim.

“I want to offer more of what I would want as a shopper, such as organic foods and local cheeses,” said Sally.

When Sally Rypkema was growing up, the store was named the Hague Supermarket. She and Jim are giving some thought to calling their store the New Hague Market.

But they realize that it will probably always be known as the Hague Market. And that will be fine with them. After all, their only goal is to ensure that Hague will always have a market to call its own.

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Next Summer owner Matthew Slaughter

Next Summer owner Matthew Slaughter

Shopping: The Lake George Needlepoint Belt

By Lisa H. Hall

Monday, July 25, 2011

How does equality-mad America cope with inequality? By poking fun at the privileged. And no one can more easily be made to look ridiculous than posh prep school alumni  (or at least those among them who don’t have the wit to hide their rank).

With the return of Memorial Day, old Exonians and others can be seen sporting needlepoint belts; belts with regimental stripes are perfectly acceptable,  but especially prized are those made by hand, featuring yacht club burgees, school crests, croquet mallets and allusive references to places like Seal Harbor and Small Point. You get the idea. A few years ago, two prepsters (Peter and Austin) started a company called Smathers & Branson to manufacture the belts, but with a wink of the eye and with irony. (But really, what’s more preppy than irony?) The product has been featured in magazines like Quest, as well as in the New York Times.

Recognizing the humor as well as the appeal of the belts, Next Summer owner Matthew Slaughter commissioned the company to make Lake George needlepoint belts. Stitched into the belt are images of a Hacker, the Minne, an outline of the lake itself, the LG oval decal, and an Adirondack chair, among other things.  Even if you find the semiotics of the needlepoint belt infra dig, you’ll want one of these.  $165. Next Summer, Main Street, Bolton Landing.

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